“Over the Fence”

Study for Over the Fence..jpg

“Over the Fence”, acrylic on 300.gsm. paper, 50cm. x  70cm. A break from Abstraction with a return to Landscape.  Many “en plein air’ studies eventually led to this painting. It is a subject that I have been returning to unsuccessfully until now.  I had always looked at the wider picture, when all along my only intent was to express the sensation of entangled undergrowth. What lies beyond remains a mystery.

“Primitive Landscape, 3”

Primitive Landscape 3

“Primitive Landscape, 3”. Acrylic on 300gsm. paper, 50cm. x  70cm.

After a few days spent away from the studio followed by hours of procrastinion, I finally decided to quit thinking and get back to work. It was a good decision. Familiar symbols appeared during the painting process, some were left to contribute to the final image, whilst others were subtracted. It is difficult to hold back; to allow the painting take its own course and not overthink or overwork it.

A Work in Progress?

Abstract Landscape. 14.

An Abstract work, acrylic on 300gsm paper, 50cm. x  70cm. It may be a work in progress, maybe not, I have not yet decided. This work was completed the day after I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, the 13th. March. Such an unlucky number, not that I am superstitious! As with my recent works, I painted intuitively; making a start then merely reponding to previous marks on the surface; continuing to what may be the end. At this stage it is usually time to reflect on the image; to interpret any meaning and to edit. This time it may simply be left as is; an indicator to a specific moment.

 

“Primitive Landscape.2”

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Primitive Landscape 2. Mixed media on paper, 50cm. x  70cm.

The trees about the cottage did not actually appear as I portrayed them in this image. There was so much more information for me to record.  Memories of the primitive sound of wind blowing eerily through otherwise impenatable undergrowth.  Ancient branches groaning in objection as one rubbed against another under relentless buffetting. Rustling foliage added to unidentifiable creaks and crashes. All combined to conjure a sense of primordial fear.