Figurative Abstract (untitled – 1)

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Figurative Abstract (untitled 1). Acrylic on canvas, 50cm. x 70cm.

Using spontaneous and intuitave responses to personal emotions, this painting again references Parkinson’s.  My use of vivid colours is a rebellious statement that rails against what could easily be a depressive disease. The tottering figure, mimics the unstable walk and freezing of gait, that makes venturing out alone a precarious business for many.

‘Its a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door.”  “You step into the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there is no telling where you might be swept off to.”  (Bilbo  Baggins – The Fellowship of the Ring.)

Keep smiling, Cheers, Dave.

 

 

“The Writing is on the Wall”

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“The Writing is on the Wall” – acrylic, ink on paper. 50cm. x 70cm.

In this chaotic painting my prime intent was to include text, I am not sure why. Maybe it is out of concern about my worsening handwriting, or more likely because I am now able to include text with a certain authority. Words that mattered little to me a year ago have now assumed gravitas, they form part of the Parkinson’s story, which is now also my story, and so they belong.

Words, like dopamine, bradykinesia and leva-dopa, can be spelt out amongst the more established symbols, taking their place in a personal abstract vacabulary that forms the image. Without enough Dopamine, brain cells that control movement die, the ability to control movement is drastically reduced, – “welcome to Parkinson’s disease, Davie”.

Text was spontaneously scrawled across  the surface with twigs dipped in various inks, I thought these final words to be a fitting title.  For no matter what – Parkinson’s is a degenerative condition, “the writing is on the wall”, and inevitably, there can be only one victor.

Cheers Dave.

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“Celtic Links”

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Continuing as a development from earlier works, even so, I consider this painting to be an ‘Intuitive Abstraction’.  Obviously my mind must have been pre-programmed by what I had painted earlier, yet it was not a planned image. Not until a certain stage in the painting process did I decide on a final image, at which point, the ‘left side’ of my brain collaborates with its opposite,  working towards the final picture.  Then I have to decide what it  all means to me.  What it may convey to the viewer may be something completely different. To me, it is an intuitive response to what has gone before, touching on the complex process of memory and its affinity with abstract painting.   I am pleased with the result.